How to Choose and Measure a Saddle

Comment  Choisir et mesurer une selle

Designed for ponies up to approximately 149cm, pony saddles are generally designed for children and small adults. With smaller stirrups and, of course, smaller seats, they look like tiny horse-sized versions of the saddle.

What size saddle for Shetland?

What size saddle for Shetland?
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How to choose the right size for a Westerne bracelet? The average western belt size is 32″, which I put on my lady. This is because the belt should extend beyond both sides of the elbow (the point at the top of the leg, where the belt goes), otherwise It will hurt.

The choice of this size depends on the height and weight of the rider. The rule of thumb for conventional saddles is 15 or 16″, suitable for children up to 1.60 m. A saddle with a seat height of 16’5 or 17″ is suitable for teenagers and adults up to 1.70m.

The most common average size is 32 cm. The size of the shoulders also depends on the breed: Arabians and Thoroughbreds generally have a narrow back and may need a narrow width.

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How to measure the Boy of a classic saddle?

How to measure the Boy of a classic saddle?
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Mark the shape of the horse’s shoulder blade (image 1) with chalk, pencil or tape. If you swipe your fingers, you’ll find the back edge. This is the starting point for your measurements.

How to measure the arch opening of a saddle? To make it easier to choose the size of the arch or the opening at the withers, it is very easy to get a wire 42 cm long, roll it in the middle and place it on your horse’s withers so that that it fits the shape perfectly.

How to measure a western saddle? In general, the distance between the horn and the rider’s body is said to be (approximately) 10 cm, with the rider’s buttocks well below the rider’s croup. (raised seat back).

Why does a saddle move forward? This problem can have various causes: the opening of the saddle arch is no longer suitable, the padding has settled (applies to wool pads), the horse has a morphology that makes the saddle move forward (back flat, small tourniquet, “downhill“ back, forward belt passage…)

What size saddle quarter to choose? – Size of quarters: The quarters must accommodate the leg, whether stretched in dressage or bent in the event of an obstacle. Standard sized quarters are fine. If you are very tall or, on the contrary, very small, the size of the standard gîtes may not be suitable for you.

Hold the pommel with your hips and pull the rump towards you. The saddle should bend slightly, just slightly. If you observe several creases in the seat, this means that the saddle has failed the bending test, the tree is broken

How do you know if your saddle is suitable?

  • The saddle should free your horse’s spine. You can put 4 fingers wide between the two plates as a guide.
  • The saddle should free the horse’s shoulders. …
  • The saddle should release the withers. …
  • The saddle should be balanced.

What size saddle for a D pony?

What size saddle for a D pony?
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In general, a saddle with a seat size of 15/16 inches is suitable for children up to 1.60 m and most double ponies. A saddle with a seat size of 16’5 / 17 inches is suitable for youngsters and adults up to around 1.70m and most small horses.

Which saddler should I choose? Choose the size of your future riding saddle A 16″ 30 saddle is more suitable for a teenager or a small rider (less than 1 m 60), which is equivalent to a 34 or a small 36. … if that is the case, do not Do not hesitate to approach your saddler to see what is possible.

Why buy a dressage saddle? A dressage saddle is like a sports shoe: it must fit perfectly for maximum comfort and utility. Riders generally purchase a saddle that will suit a particular horse. These models are designed to help the driver be accurate.

Height at withers type of horse Simplified size
From 160cm to 170cm horse horse
From 148cm to 160cm Big pony D / little horse Ear
Up to 148 cm² Pony C and D pony
Up to 130 cm² Pony B pony

How to measure the height of a horse?

How to measure the height of a horse?
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A horse’s height is measured from the ground to its highest solid bony structure, the withers. Horse owners and especially traders recognize that a “hand” always represents 10 cm and that the height of the horse at the withers is measured from the ground.

How to know the size of the saddle? Make sure your butt touches the back of the chair. Take a tape measure and slide it along your femur from the end of your knee to the back of your buttocks. Unlike western saddles, English saddles do not have a very wide back leg and therefore tend to be longer.

In four-legged animals, the withers is an area of ​​the body located at the top, where the neck and back meet. The measurement from the withers to the ground, “height at the withers”, is the standard size for a number of four-legged friends, including horses and dogs. It is measured by placing the measuring board on the back of the leg.

Where can you find more advice for choosing a riding saddle?

You may not have found all the information you need to choose your riding saddle by reading these tips. It is true that it is not necessarily easy to choose a saddle to use on your horse: it is not every day that you will have this difficult choice to make! Fortunately, there are many other sites on the web that will help you achieve your goals, including exceptional advice for finding your riding saddle. By choosing to go to an online sales site that also offers advice on riding equipment, you will have articles and advice on the most common scenarios.

Although many e-commerce sites exist in the horse riding world, if we had to remember only one, we could only encourage you to visit the horse riding shop https://equi-clic.com/fr: all the advice for choosing your riding saddle are available and accessible to all, and this for free! With an impressive number of riding saddles available on this site, all you have to do is place your order, without leaving your home…